https://doi.org/10.1351/goldbook.C00876
A substance that increases the rate of a reaction without modifying the overall standard Gibbs energy change in the reaction; the process is called @[email protected] The catalyst is both a @[email protected] and @[email protected] of the reaction. The words catalyst and @[email protected] should not be used when the added substance reduces the @[email protected] (see @[email protected]). @[email protected] can be classified as @[email protected], in which only one phase is involved, and @[email protected], in which the reaction occurs at or near an @[email protected] between phases. @[email protected] brought about by one of the products of a reaction is called autocatalysis. @[email protected] brought about by a group on a reactant molecule itself is called @[email protected] The term @[email protected] is also often used when the substance is consumed in the reaction (for example: base-catalysed @[email protected] of @[email protected]). Strictly, such a substance should be called an @[email protected]
See also:
autocatalytic reaction
,
bifunctional catalysis
,
catalytic coefficient
,
electron-transfer catalysis
,
general acid catalysis
,
general base catalysis
,
intramolecular catalysis
,
micellar catalysis
,
Michaelis–Menten kinetics
,
phase-transfer catalysis
,
pseudo-catalysis
,
rate of reaction
,
specific catalysis
Source:
PAC, 1996, 68, 149. (A glossary of terms used in chemical kinetics, including reaction dynamics (IUPAC Recommendations 1996)) [Terms] [Paper]